This Woman’s Work: 7 Works of Feminist Horror

This Woman’s Work: 7 Works of Feminist Horror

This Woman's Work: 7 Works of Feminist Horror - 140
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“I stand outside this woman’s work/this woman’s world”–Kate Bush

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“I am a woman with thoughts and questions and shit to say. I say if I’m beautiful. I say if I’m strong. You will not determine my story—I will.”–Amy Schumer

Horror fiction is dominated by male authors, writing stories about men from a male perspective, and there’s nothing anyone can do to change that.

Wrong.

Horror fiction is always evolving and adapting, because the genre is shaped by those who write it and those who read it. If anything is a clear indication that horror is taking on a new identity, it’s the year 2020. A quick glance at the year’s bestsellers and fan favorites will tell the story of horror knocking down antiquated boundaries and gatekeeping and instead embracing new voices telling their own stories. These are seven recommendations of horror by women who demand to be heard.

girl-like-a-bomb

into-the-forest-and-all-the-way-through

apple-and-knife-66

Black-cranes-tales-of-unquiet-women

slay-stories-of-the-vampire-noire-6

ring-shout

a-nest-of-nightmares


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3 thoughts on “This Woman’s Work: 7 Works of Feminist Horror

  1. If anything, your review of A NEST OF NIGHTMARES understates its potency. Tuttle’s stories feel like they descend from Shirley Jackson and maybe more so those lesser known women writers whose work populates the crime anthology, TROUBLED DAUGHTERS, TWISTED WIVES. Tuttle’s collection was my favorite read last year, published 20+ years later in the U.S. than it should have been.

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